Tag Archives: 1919

National Parks 100th Birthday, i.e., Centennial, Is Just For The ‘Park Service’ — Not Any Famous Parks.

by Anura Guruge


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Click to access “National Park Service” (NPS) 100th Birthday celebration page. They do point out correctly that this is all about the August 25, 1916 CREATION of the ‘Park Service’.


And President Obama visited 2 National Parks
to mark the upcoming Centennial.

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Click image to access the original “Voice of America” coverage.


To be fair the National Park Service (NPS), in general, has done a good job pointing out that this 100th Birthday celebrations relate to the CREATION of the Park Service than any of the famous National Parks.

They do, however, as I have already pointed out subscribe to this — THOUGH that is wrong! Acadia only became a National Park in 1919.

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Here is an extract from an Excel spreadsheet I created on when the
current 59 National Parks were officially established.

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Notice that Yellowstone, the first Park to be established, is now 144 years old. Yosemite & Sequoia, both of which we visited in April, are 126s old.

Yes, there are 3 Parks turning 100 this year, but they are not ‘famous’.

2019 will be THE BANNER year — with the Grand Canyon, Zion and Acadia (again).


Related posts:
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by Anura Guruge

Acadia National Park Centennial In July 2016 Three-Years Too Premature!

by Anura Guruge


As I posted here 2-days ago the ‘National Park Service’ (NPS) on their Website has this banner proclaiming ‘Acadia National Park‘, 1916 — 2016, Centennial.

That, however, is a bit of poetic license — and I am sure the NPS knows that Acadia has NOT been a National Park for 100 years — as yet!

On July 8, 1916 the area south of Bar Harbor was established as the Sieur de Monts National Monument. Not a park, but a Monument — as is the case with ‘Canyon de Chelly‘, one of my most favorite places in the world, ever. See below for the distinction between the two.

It only became a park on Wednesday, February 26, 1919.
[Kind of ironic. Though this ‘creation’ would have happened in Washington, D.C., this would have been the dead of winter at the Park per se.]

It was the SAME DAY that the ‘Grand Canyon‘ was also established. So that is special.

But it was NOT called ‘Acadia’ in 1919! That only came to be 10 years later, on January 19, 1929. It was created as ‘Lafayette National Park‘. Here is the NPS brochure to ‘Lafayette National Park’ from 1921.

On page 3 of the brochure you can see this:

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Interesting description of the Park. Doesn’t make it sound that appealing to visit.


Wikipedia sums it all up quite succinctly.

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Click to ENLARGE and read here. Use link above to access Wikipedia entry for the Park.



Distinction between a National Monument and a National Park.

Click each image to ENLARGE and read here.

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What the ‘National Park Service’ says. At: http://www.nps.gov/cong/faqs.htm

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The ‘Sierra Club’ has a ‘better’ description. From: vault.sierraclub.org/planet/199611/nationalpark.asp


Related posts:
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by Anura Guruge

King George V’s November 7, 1919, Proclamation Introducing The 2 Minute ‘Great Silence’.

Anura Guruge, June 8, 2013.

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by
Anura Guruge


Related posts:
1/ Origins Of “Armistice Day” (a.k.a “Poppy Day”) — June 11, 2013.
2/ ‘Blood Red Poppy Plaque’, Ontario, Canada … — July 3, 2013.
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Part of My “Poppy Day” series on this Blog.

This post, as with other recent related posts, at the behest of  ‘Nancy’,
the lady from Ontario Canada who sent me the original, side on, picture of the ‘Poppy Plaque’ in Thunder Bay, Ontario.


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From http://www.salegion.co.za/two-minutes-silence.html. Click image to ENLARGE. Use link below to access original.

Click here to access original.


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From http://www.thetwominutesilence.co.uk/history. Click image to ENLARGE. Click link below to access the original.

Click here to access original.


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From http://www.bbc.co.uk/remembrance/how/silence.shtml. Click image to ENLARGE. Click link below to access original.

Click here to access original.


Nancy's transcript of the King's proclamation. Scanned image cope she sent to me. Click to ENLARGE.

Nancy’s transcript of the King’s proclamation. Scanned image cope she sent to me. Click to ENLARGE.


My continuing efforts, at the urging of ‘Nancy’, to accurately document as much of this history as possible.

The above BBC page has more of the Edward George Honey letter than I had in my earlier post. So that is good.

I would love to get my hands on the 7 November 1919 The Times of London with the actual proclamation.

Thank you, Nancy.

Origins Of “Armistice Day” (a.k.a “Poppy Day”).

Anura Guruge, June 8, 2013.

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by
Anura Guruge


Related ‘Poppy’ posts:
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Plaque in memory of Australian Edward George Honey in “Kings Domain”, Birdwood Avenue, City of Melbourne, Down Under.


Part of My “Poppy Day” series on this Blog.

This post, as with other recent related posts, contributed by ‘Nancy’
the lady from Ontario Canada who sent me the picture of the ‘Poppy Plaque‘ in Thunder Bay, Ontario.


London Evening News in 1918.

On May 8, 1919, a letter to the editor signed ‘Warren Foster’ appears in London Evening News proposing the first anniversary of the armistice ending World War I 1918 November 11th, be commemorated by several moments of silence.

The author, actually an Australian journalist named George Edward Honey, living in London (U.K.), after being invalided out of the in the British army with a leg injury, was concerned about the huge celebrations on the streets on “Victory Day” 1918.

He suggested a silent commemoration of the sacrifices made and the lives lost during the war would be a far more appropriate way to mark the first anniversary of its end – the first “Armistice Day” in 1919.

Placement of the above plaque.

“Five little minutes only, silent minutes of national remembrance.  A very sacred intercession. Communion with the Glorious Dead who won us peace, and from the communion new strength, hope and faith in the morrow. Church services, too, if you will, but in the street, the home, the theatre, anywhere, indeed, where Englishmen and their women chance to be, surely in this five minutes of bitter-sweet silence there will be service enough.”

Honey’s letter did not immediately bring about a change but a similar suggestion was made to Sir Percy Fitzpatrick that October, reaching King George V, who on November 7, 1919, made an official proclamation, practicality setting it as a 2 minute period of silence (as opposed to ‘5’), beginning with the first stroke of the hour of 11 am November 11th across the Empire.

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We today are used to gatherings at local cenotaphs but most weren’t up yet in 1919. These monuments seem to have killed the brilliant idea of a stoppage in ordinary places to reflect individually, no dignitaries and school children and old guys having photo ops.