Tag Archives: 4 story house

Charge Port & Screen Protectors For The Garmin Fenix 5.

by Anura Guruge


Click to ENLARGE.

My Garmin Fenix 5 with the Kimilar Screen Protector on.



Click to ENLARGE and read Amazon product description.


Click to ENLARGE and read Amazon product description.


I am not going to take any chances with my new Garmin Fenix 5. I am hoping that we will have a good, long term relationship. So far, it looks very promising.

I had shied away from using screen protectors with both my Garmin Vivoactive 3s & Fitbit Ionic. They both had touchscreens and I did not want anything getting in the way.

Not so with the Fenix 5. It does not have a touchscreen. Plus I got the glass version where the screen is not as rugged as the sapphire version. I did some research and many people advised getting a screen protector. I looked around in Amazon and got the ‘Kimilar’ shown above. It did the job — as stated and promised. No drama. It comes with a suction plunger — I assume to remove the protector if need be. I still have two left.

I already had the USB port protectors that I had got for the Vivoactive 3. So, that was handy.

So, just wanted to share.


Related posts:
Search ‘Garmin’ & ‘Fitbit’.


by Anura Guruge

Yes, It Is True: Cisco Linksys RE1000 Wireless-N Range Extender Works BUT Drops Wi-Fi Connection On A Regular Basis.

Anura Guruge, June 8, 2013.

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by
Anura Guruge


Re1000pluggedinRelated posts:
>>
Cisco Linksys RE 1000 — Aug. 10, 2013.
>>
Ventilated shelf for Linksys EA3500
>>Sep. 18, 2012.

>> It really was the D-Link router …
>> Sep. 9, 2012.

++++ Search ‘Linksys’ for other posts >>>>


I took a sledgehammer to the RE1000!

RE2000 is as bad as RE1000!


DlinkextenderThe Cisco Linksys RE1000 Wireless-N Range Extender I bought, refurbished from Amazon in mid-August for $39, sure does work and works well when it is working.

But, I had noticed, by detecting a drop in signal level at the basement that it drops the Wi-Fi connection — maybe once a week.

To re-establish the connection you just have to recycle power; i.e., unplug RE1000 from wall socket, count to ‘Mississippi 10’ and then plug it back in. The ‘blue-light‘ on the unit will flash for a few seconds and then stay on — solid. You, again, have Wi-Fi connection. Easy enough, though annoying.

Happened again yesterday. I recycled it and was ‘OK’. But, this time I decided to check the Web.

Hello, hello, hello. I am, not by a long chalk, the only one who has noticed this problem. LOTS of reports on the Web of the same problem.

I then looked at the ‘new’ RE1000 replacement, the RE2000. That appears to be no better. I was basically warned off from getting it.

I looked around. I will NOT replace the RE1000. I already have it. I decided to AUGMENT.

So, I am getting a 2nd Wi-Fi range-extender. Then I can have one on the 1st floor and another in the basement. The damn things, in the scheme of things, are cheap enough.

This time I went with D-Link. I like D-Link. I trust D-Link. I started using D-Link for my Wi-Fi in 2001. I had D-Link technology until September 2012 when my latest and last D-Link Wi-Fi router blew-up. I went with Cisco Linksys because the TDS technician recommended it — as the TDS favorite.

Funnily enough I don’t use a Wi-Fi router, myself, since then! I have my own dedicated fiber! So no router. The Wi-Fi router is for the rest of the family.

I got a D-Link DAP-1320 N 300Mbps Wi-Fi Range Extender. Gets better reviews than the RE1000. I got one for $27.04 with FREE shipping. Christmas is coming and I am getting a jump start on ordering all of the Lego sets we need for the kids! So no problem these days getting a more than $35 order put together. One Lego set covers that.

Lets wait and see. For $27.04 I will happily avoid the aggravation. So ideally the D-Link will boost the signal and let the RE1000 get a piggy-back.

Cisco Linksys RE1000 Wireless-N Range Extender: Truly A ‘Piece of Cake’, Plug-and-Play Device; 4 Minute Setup.

Anura Guruge, June 8, 2013.

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.
by
Anura Guruge


Re1000pluggedinRelated posts:
>>
Ventilated shelf for Linksys EA3500
>>Sep. 18, 2012.

>> It really was the D-Link router …
>> Sep. 9, 2012.

++++ Search ‘Linksys’ for other posts >>>>


<< I took a sledgehammer, April 18, 2014,
to this piece of junk! >>


We have had a high-end Cisco Linksys EA3500 Wi-Fi router since September last year. It is a dual-band wireless-N router and it does give us Wi-Fi right through the house.

While everything is relative (and I think of it as a small house) this is a 4-story, full-size New England colonial with all four floors in use. The top floor, the 4th floor, is a large open room that we use as our office. The Linksys EA3500 is mounted on the side wall in this 4th floor room. Since we have two 15Mbps fiber links coming into the house, one comes in on one wall the other on the other side.

Cisco Linksys RE1000.

Cisco Linksys RE1000.

Our ASUS and Toshiba laptops as well as the two Google Nexus 7 pads don’t have a problem picking up a decent Wi-Fi signal anywhere in the house. Even the DirecTV Wi-Fi box works fine — though it is as far from the EA3500 as you can get. Our family room, with the ‘big’ computer is on the bottom floor — three (3) flights of stairs down.

But, I decided we need a stronger Wi-Fi signal on the lower 2 floors.

So, I looked around. I kind of knew that there were range extenders.

I am savvy enough to know that it makes sense to stick with the same vendor, if possible, though, of course, Wi-Fi, based on rigorous standards, is vendor agnostics. But, given that we now have a Linksys (after a decade of swearing by D-Link) I looked at the Linksys offerings. As is my wont when looking for ‘accessories’ such as this, I started with Amazon.

I quickly spotted the Linksys RE1000 Wireless-N Range Extender. I also saw that there were Cisco-refurbished units for $39 — with a 90-day warranty (though I don’t worry about such things with Amazon since they are so good about returns).

Wi-Fi extender has no moving parts. I knew that ‘refurbished’ meant that customers had just returned it — possibly because they couldn’t get it to work.

I have had great luck with refurbished electronics and this was the simplest of these devices. So I ordered a refurbished for $39 and got the FREE shipping.

I placed the order last Friday night and it arrived in the mail on Thursday.

I went to install it this evening. It was a piece of cake. About 4 minutes start to finish. All I had to supply, as I expected, was the Wi-Fi password for our network. Bingo. Done. Bob, was my uncle.

That really was plug-and-play. OK, there was one hitch. You have to use a supplied CD to get it up and running. The setup application on the CD does not run on Windows 8. That was annoying. So I had to swap laptops. That was the only hitch.

It has noticeably increased Wi-Fi bandwidth in the lower flows. The laptops are getting 65Mbps — and I think that that they are gated by their chip sets.

So for $40 this was a worthwhile investment. I am particularly delighted by how easy it was to set up.

RE1000-Network_Diagram

Extend this two-fold to get a rough idea of our setup. But the same basic idea — our router right at the top and three floors below it.

Now in the interest of full disclosure I have to admit that Cisco was a long-term client of mine and that over nearly a decade I had a kind of on-again, off-again near incestous relationship with Cisco — my loyalties sometimes torn by my ‘lifelong’ association with IBM. Yes, I actually do have a Cisco employee badge — because I was theoretically employed by them for a few months. Yes, Cisco bought a token-ring startup I was involved with — after I made a phone call. Yes, I got stock options. But this was in the 90s. Yes, I used to own a fair number of Cisco shares. No longer. So in reality I don’t really have a conflict of interest — other than a chequered, and interesting, history.