Tag Archives: buses

The “Acadia National Park” Proposed Traffic Limitation Plan — The OFFICIAL YouTube Videos.

by Anura Guruge



These are ‘National Park Service‘ produced videos. I came across them thanks to Twitter. [As to why they split it into three, I do not know.]

Whether you had heard of the proposed ‘Acadia National Park‘ traffic limitation (in reality mitigation) plan or not, these videos are worth watching. They graphically illustrate the traffic problem that they are trying to deal with.

I can empathize though we typically manage to avoid the traffic.

As regulars here know, we try to make it to Acadia at least twice a year — and have already made one trip in 2018, i.e., in early March. We have visited 10-times since 2013.

We usually go in late June and early September — though we have also been there in July. The June and Sept. times we go are NOT peak-peak. Plus, I now know my way around, am familiar with the back routes and also know when the crowds will be.

I am also aware that Yosemite already has a similar reservation plan. I think that it is kind of inevitable. Maybe, as some had already feared a few years ago, the whole park may become BUS-ONLY (like the Western part of the Grand Canyon).

Not sure how they can partition the ‘Ocean Drive’ section of the ‘Loop Road‘ since it is a one-way.

I can’t say I am opposed to the need for some traffic regulation. But, I am hoping that it won’t impact me too greatly since I am willing to travel off-peak.

Anywho …

You should watch these videos. Well worth it. Well produced.


Related posts:
Category ‘Acadia’.


by Anura Guruge

Just Ahead Of Independence Day U.K. Daily Mails Touts The Beauties Of Sri Lanka.

by Anura Guruge


Click here to access the U.K. “Daily Mail” original
from January 31, 2016.

Click these images to ENLARGE and enjoy here.
All from the “Daily Mail” article.


srdailymailjan312016111

sldailymailjan3222222 sldailymailjan311111


Good interesting piece by the great folks at the “Daily Mail” (my favorite newspaper, all my adult life, and the only one I still read, every day, without fail).

The ‘Routemaster‘ reference, ALAS, has to do with the U.S. audience. When I first read it I broke out in a COLD SWEAT. Sri Lanka had changed which side of the road they drove on. I had to Google and checked. ‘Thank Buddha’ they had NOT. They, quite CORRECTLY, drive on the LEFT-HAND SIDE as you are supposed to do. So the British ‘Routemaster’ buses are driving on the right side as they are meant to do — which means on the left-hand side. Other than that the rest is fine. Enjoy.


by Anura Guruge


U.K. Poppy Appeal 2013: Poppy Girls Single, Concert & The Duchess Of Cornwall, Camilla.

LPD-2012-670x437

2012 London appeal.

Anura Guruge, June 8, 2013.

..
.
.
.
.
by
Anura Guruge


Related posts:
1/ King George V’s ‘Great Silence’ proclamation … — July 9, 2013.
2/ Origins Of “Armistice Day” (a.k.a “Poppy Day”) — June 11, 2013.
++++ Search for ‘Poppy’ using sidebar SEARCH esp. for 2103 posts >>>>


Please check dedicated ‘Red Poppy’ PAGE
above (↑↑) with tons of pictures and history.


poppygirls11

Click to read BCC coverage. You will be glad you did.


Click to watch YouTube video posted by my 2nd favorite newspaper, 'The Telegraph'.

Click to watch YouTube video posted by my 2nd favorite newspaper, ‘The Telegraph’.


2013, November 11, Remembrance Day News: U.K. Birmingham Buses, Camilla & Canadian Dollar Store Reversal

Anura Guruge, June 8, 2013.ar133803739028928

..
.
by
Anura Guruge


Related posts:
1/ King George V’s ‘Great Silence’ proclamation … — July 9, 2013.
2/ Origins Of “Armistice Day” (a.k.a “Poppy Day”) — June 11, 2013.
++++ Search for ‘Poppy’ using sidebar SEARCH esp. for 2103 posts >>>>


Please check dedicated ‘Red Poppy’ PAGE
above (↑↑) with tons of pictures and history.



poppybus

Click to read story …


CamilaPoppy

Click for story …


dollarstorepoppy

Click …

The Grand Canyon Experience Keeps On Getting Better Over The Decades. Better Now Than It Was A Decade Ago.

Dec2013x125


..

by
Anura Guruge


A few of you may have noticed that I had not done any posts for nearly 5 days — finally doing one late last night. That was because we were at the Grand Canyon, this having been vacation week in northern New Hampshire. It was the first trip to Arizona for Deanna and the two younger kids. I, on the other hand, have spent a lot of time in AZ starting in 1980 — doing a ton of work for ITT Courier (in Tempe) and POS equipment manufacturer Hyperterm. I can’t remember whether this was my eighth or ninth trip to the Canyon since I used to do daytrips from Tempe to the Canyon and back. I first visited in the Summer of 1980. My last trip prior to this was in February 2001, with the two older kids, when we took a helicopter from Las Vegas to Western part of the Canyon. My last time to the South Rim village was in 2000.

The Canyon, of course, despite the inevitable but not perceptible erosion, remains unparalleled and breathtaking. That is my metric. It took my breath away the first time I saw it, though I had steeled myself to be ‘cool’, and it has taken my breath away each time I have seen it since.

But, the whole Grand Canyon tourist experience has got much better over the years and I am so delighted by what I saw and experienced this last 4 days.


South Rim, from the Village, opposite Bright Angel Lodge, with the Lookout Studio (with the white roof) to the left. All pictures (or at least 99.5% of the 1,571 that were on the 3 digital cameras) by Deanna. All the pictures will ENLARGE if you click on them.


Teischan’s first view of the Canyon. She wasn’t sure how to frame and process what she was confronted with. She seems to be pointing at it. This is smack dab in the middle of the Village. Right opposite Bright Angel Lodge.


From my perspective here are the things that have changed for the better (and all involved, in particular the Park Service and Xanterra South Rim LLC (which runs all of the hospitality services including the lodges and eateries) deserve kudos.

1. Concerted emphasis on ecology, conservation and all things ‘green-related’: A lot of what they (in particular Xanterra) is pushing and enforcing at the South Rim should be the order of the day right across the world. They no longer sell bottled water at the South Rim and proactively discourage the use of plastic straws — with the servers at some of the restaurants wearing big ‘STRAW FREE’ pins. I have never understood people’s fascination with bottled water. Now at the South Rim they were enforcing what I have always believed in and advocated. Use reusable bottles and fill them up from a tap (and here I am talking as one who nearly died, when I was about 12, from drinking contaminated water from a rainwater barrel).  I had never really thought about the straws but that makes a lot of sense too. Altogether the unremitting messaging about conservation and saving the planet was positive and was never grating. This messaging should be universal and not just limited to the Canyon. I have never been prouder of the Park Service — and I have always had a soft spot for them.

2. Total eradication of noise pollution: Wow. The thing that I most savored was the deep, profound silence of the Canyon. You could hear the silence. The total absorbance of sound was magical — and it isn’t as if I am subject to much noise on my dirt road in rural, central NH. What they have done, as they had wanted to do for decades, was to ban sightseeing helicopters and planes from the 50 mile, main section of the Canyon. What a difference. In the past you could never get away from the constant and annoying buzz and drone. Now, just white noise level ‘nothing’, occasionally punctuated by the harsh call of black crows (which they call ravens out there). We saw helicopters, but they were being used to haul heavy material to Phantom Ranch at the bottom for the start of the season. But, they flew far out and were not around for long. In marked contrast, sunset in Sedona was like being at an airport.

3. Proliferation of wildlife: The first morning as we drove up to the Village we saw a herd of Elk grazing by the railway line and the mule corrals. I first thought that we had lucked out. Not so. Elk abound. We even saw an Elk grazing away on the lawn of the famous El Tovar Grand Hotel. It has become like Yosemite or Skyline Drive. Come dusk Elk everywhere. Talking to a Ranger I discovered that the deer and the Elk have actually become a problem. Devanee heard that they are planning to plant a different type of grass in the Village to curb the migration into the very midst of the main tourist area. We also got to see a condor.



4. Reasonably priced food: The food prices, in general, were not that different to what you would pay at McDonalds! That was a pleasant surprise and respite. Makes a total mockery of the prices charged by NH ski resorts like Gunstock and Loon. The Grand Canyon really is in the middle of nowhere. Hauling stuff to it is expensive. So they could justify expensive prices. That they don’t is great. It is a pity that our ski resorts (and the NH Highland Games) just want to exploit the punters.

5. Use of natural gas powered buses and encouraging people to use them.

To be fair there was just one thing that I was not impressed about and it is one of my perennial issues with contemporary life – lack of a dress code in fancy restaurants. We made a reservation and went to dinner at the El Tovar. Now the ‘El’ is billed as one of the Grand Hotels in the U.S. and the dining room is classed as ‘Grand’. Well, the dining room and the service was immaculate, BUT having hobos coming into dine in shorts and T-shirts just detracts from the experience. Yes, I complained verbally and in writing.

The other thing that I noticed and bemused me is the mobile device addiction. You are at the Grand and people have their noses stuck on a small screen. It is a pity — though watching people take pictures using a 10″ iPad was cool, given the large viewfinder so to speak.

Overall it was a great few days. Deanna is still going: ‘Wow, Wow, Wow …’. The kids were overwhelmed.