Tag Archives: buying

Buying ‘Weatherables’ Deck Railing From Home Depot — The Way To Go.

by Anura Guruge


Home Depot & Weatherables work together — cooperatively.


Click to ENLARGE.


E-mailed quote from Weatherables.

Click to ENLARGE and study.


Quote for Weatherables generated by Home Depot.

Click to ENLARGE and admire.


The Weatherable Railing I installed.


Buying 40′ of Weatherable 36″ high Birmingham/Vilano deck railing from Home Depot rather than directly from Weatherables was 12% cheaper ($166) — and I did NOT have to pay $225 shipping costs (since HD does not charge any shipping as long as you pick it up at one of their stores).

And here is where it gets even BETTER. Weatherables did NOT have a problem with me placing the order through Home Depot rather than through them. They actually e-mailed their quote to Home Depot — DIRECTLY — so that HD could generate a new quote for me! That was pretty neat. The salesman, who was very helpful, even told me that he was ‘very cool’ with it because he gets a bigger commission for orders placed through HD. That seems strange but as an ex-salesman (earning commission) I was happy for him.

So it was WIN-WIN all around. Everybody was happy.

What I found, at least in the Concord (NH) and Rochester (NH) Home Depot stores, was that you really can’t find any HD employees who can really help you, with absolute confidence, when it comes to ordering the Weatherables stuff. They try but it is soon clear that they are as much at sea as I was. They suggest that you try and order online.

That is when I called up Weatherables and asked them to put together a quote. They were happy to do so and did it on the phone. The salesman I got knew his stuff and explained everything to me. The ONLY thing he REFUSED to touch — for obvious liability issues — was what length lag screws I should use to secure the metal posts onto my deck in the 3 places where I could not drill through to attach a bottom plate because there was a tall deck leg/post underneath. That was funny. He just refused to answer that. (I ended up using 3″ & 3.5″ lag screws, two on each post.)

Once the Weatherables salesman e-mailed his quote to Home Depot — to the Rochester store (and they had the e-mail) — I heard from a HD rep. within 24-hours. It was very quick and very smooth. HD called me, twice, to keep me appraised as to when the shipment would arrive. It was pretty quick. Within days. I was happy.

Another good deal with Home Depot.

 


Related Posts:
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by Anura Guruge

New Hampshire: Buying Car Out-of-State & Transporting It Back.

Anura Guruge December 2014 thumbnail.
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by Anura Guruge


tempplate12123Related posts:
>> NH car registration fee …

++++ Search on ‘train’, ‘plane’, ‘cars’ & ‘automobile’ for other related posts >>>>


As far as I can see, and I have spoken at length with DMV folks at Concord, N.H. and our (always extremely helpful) Tax collection ladies at Alton Town Hall here are the only valid LEGAL options for purchasing a car out-of-state and bringing it back to New Hampshire.

1. Have it transported to N.H. via a transport service.

2. Trailer it yourself using a flatbed trailer.

3. Go buy the car, out-of-state, bring the title, bill-of-sale and odometer statement back to N.H., get PERMANENT plates, go back, out-of-state, PUT the plates on and drive back.

4. Get valid ‘Transit Plates‘ in the state of purchase and use those to drive the car back.

5. Convince the seller to drive to N.H., with the plates they have, go to a DMV or to your town, complete the purchase and then get plates.


Things that will not work and those that are NOT legal.

** Contrary to what the seller might tell you, you CAN NOT just take N.H. plates from an existing car and use them on the out-of-state car, temporarily, to bring it back. That can land you in some very hot water. A number of sellers that I have spoken to have told me to do this BUT I am not that stupid — contrary to what I may look and act. DMV and others have confirmed that this falls under misuse of plates and is considered a serious crime — as it should be.

** Massachusetts State Troopers (depending on their whim) will refuse to recognize N.H. 20-day Temporary Plates and ticket you! This came as a surprise to me. I know that during my last 30 years in N.H. I have been to MA in cars that had temp plates. I wasn’t stopped BUT it appears that this happens. Check it out.

** N.H. Towns, like Alton, cannot issue 20-day temp. plates. Only DMV locations can do so and you have to have registration, bill of sales etc. in order to get one.


I have been finding all of these to my costs because I have been looking at buying a car out-of-state.

Over the years I have bought a few cars in MA, a Jeep Cherokee in 1989 in Lowell, a red Camaro Z28 in 1987 in Lowell and a Cadillac. I bought a black, fully-loaded Cadillac STS from ‘Cadillac of Norwood‘, in MA, on Thanksgiving eve in 1996. I had done the whole deal over the telephone. Drove down in a Green Firebird that I was trading in and drove back in my black ‘Rocket Ship‘ STS. Can’t remember how the plate situation worked. This was a long time ago and I bought all of these from large dealers. I guess they put some kind of dealer plates. Never had any problems.

But now I was looking at private out-of-state sales.

Transportation is not as bad as it sounds. You can get a car from the East Coast for between $250 and $500. If you have AAA you can get it trailered relatively inexpensively.

Going out-of-state buying the car coming back with the paperwork, getting the plates and going back only really works if the distance is not that great. Once you get to around 100 miles it becomes impractical because you are talking two full round-trips.

The seller driving up to N.H. works but as you can imagine many will not be motivated to do so UNLESS they start getting desparate. I did have a seller who was willing to drive up from Plymouth, MA — but only after he realized that I had ruled him out.

Thought that this might help you. 


Mercedes-Benz CONFIRMS My Long-Held Assertion That Those That Drive Their Cars Are Mentally Challenged.

Click to ENLARGE. Note the 3-pointed badge.

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by Anura Guruge


Related posts:
>> 
Proof that Mercedes-Benz drivers are clueless.
>> Superdome Named After A German Car Manufacturer.
>>  Volkswagen’s Super Bowl XLVII ‘Jamaican’ Ad.

++++
Search ‘German for other posts >>>>


mbpedsadad

Click to ENLARGE and enjoy here. Use link below to access the Mercedes-Benz original.

Click here for the Mercedes-Benz original IF you want further proof.


Quod erat demonstrandum
(Q.E.D.)

What more do I have to say?

I might not be the brightest bulb out there, BUT I do NOT
need any technology to help me
DETECT PEDESTRIANS
when I am driving.

They are, to folks with even a modicum of gray matter, fairly easy to spot.

Just further proof of my long held contention.

People who buy German cars are clueless.

What do I have AGAINST German cars.

THIS ↓

Liverpool_Blitz_D_5984
liverpoolblitz
Liverpool_Blitz_D_5983


I visited Liverpool for the first time in 1980. I was the Customer Support Manager for ITT (U.K.) and I had to meet with some customers, waterfront. As usual I drove. I think I was driving a Gold 2L Ford Cortina, my company car at the time. As I was driving into the city I could see all these desolate, empty spaces. Complete blocks with nothing on them. I wasn’t sure what the deal was. At lunch, and my job as Customer Support Manager, was 50% entertainment, I asked the Liverpudlians what the empty spaces were all about. There was a silence for a second. They all looked at me. Well they kind of knew I wasn’t totally stupid. They also recognized that I had not grown up in Britain, and that I was NOT being funny. They then all jumped in at once and went onto explain that those were still the unbuilt lots after the WW II blitz. I was stunned. WW II had ended 35 years earlier. I had never seen any major WW II damage in London. This was an EYE OPENER.

On the way back I stopped at one of these empty lots and got out of the car. It was a strange feeling. A tangible connection with WW II. I was born 8 years after the War. But standing there was very profound. It annoyed me no end that the Germans had done this to Liverpool, to the British and as such also to I. That is when I avowed that I will do my best never to buy anything German. It was MY small way of showing my respects to what I saw in Liverpool.

I have been good to my word (as I tend to be). A few years later, in what was meant to be a big ‘honor’ I was given, by CASE Communications, a Mercedes Benz as a company car. I kept it for 2 months. But, NOTE I did not buy it. It was given to me and it was meant to be a FAVOR. A recognition. Yes, I have driven German cars. But they do nothing for me. Yes, I have been to Germany more times than most. But Germany doesn’t appeal to me much — though I do recognize that it is beautiful country. The images of Liverpool STILL haunt me.

I worked with a very rich Jew. He was always going on about the Nazi persecution of Jews. But one day it occurred to me that this guy, for all of his talk, owned over $100K in German cars. So one day when I was talking to him on the phone, and in those days we spoke quite often, I said: “G** have you worked out how much the German cars you have parked in your driveway, right now, must cost?” He thought for a minute and replied: “Those 3 must have cost at least $75K” — and we are talking 15 years ago. I then asked: “WHY?”

So that is why I continue to make fun of those that by German cars — and that used to include, to his annoyance and sometimes embarrassment, my adoptive (now late) father.