Tag Archives: CPS

Dr. Guannan Ge, Dartmouth-Hitchcock (Lebanon), The BEST Pain Doctor In New Hampshire?

by Anura Guruge


Click to ENLARGE & read here. You can find her at: dartmouth-hitchcock.org.


I think so.

We met with her this morning, in Lebanon. NO. Not for I. For the wife. She had been referred to her.

When I read her bio — above — I just couldn’t believe what I was reading. Sounded true good to be true. The type of doctor I had been hoping to someday find.

Well, she proved to be as GOOD as what she claimed in the bio — if not better.

IMPRESSIVE.

Young, but sure knows her stuff. Confident, self-assured, poised — but very low-key & non-pushy.

Wow. She actually understands PAIN! She knows the key role the brain & nervous system plays when it comes to pain. WOW. A doctor, at last, that is willing to talk about — even diagnose — central pain (now referred to as ‘Central Sensitization’). She was a revelation.

Over the last 14-year we must have seen at least 8 other so called ‘pain specialist’. They were all, in the end, charlatans. All of them put together (& they were all males) did not have her expertise, acumen & touch.

Wow. I was so impressed. (Have you already kind of got that impression that I kind of liked her?)

Well, I do know a bit about ‘pain’. I have written a book about it. SMILE. Yes, I gave her a copy & she was very gracious in thanking me for it.

I am looking forward to working with her. What a JOY.

Yes, she is native Chinese — in that she was born in China & did some of her schooling there. Great credit to China.

I the past I always tried to find Indian doctors. As of now, I am going to start by looking for Chinese doctors!

She (somewhat) restored my faith in DHMC.


Related Posts:
Search on ‘central pain.
Check Category ‘books’.


by Anura Guruge


Quadricep Tendon Tear Knee Surgery: Day 4 — Negligible Pain Throughout!

by Anura Guruge


Click to ENLARGE and admire. You can see the staples above the white dressing.


Click image to access must read post.


I had my quadriceps tendon repair surgery,
at ‘
Frisbie Memorial Hospital‘ —
performed by Dr. Charles Blitzer
of ‘Seacoast Orthopedics
on Thursday, March 7, 2019.

Today, as such, is the 4th full-day, post surgery.


There is, touch wood, very little pain — as yet.

I hope it continues to be the case. It sure would be nice and a welcome relief.

The whole surgery experience, so far, has really been near miraculous. I am in total awe.

Yes, no question, the knee hurts, like billy-o if it bends (or moves). But, I am NOT supposed to bend it.

When I keep it straight and immobile, I have had little pain. I truly lucked out. Just hoping that pain does not suddenly engulf me and I am doing everything I can to make sure that I don’t end up with ‘Central Pain Syndrome‘ (CPS) six-months down the road. Right now I am hopeful. That I haven’t had major pain to drive my central nervous system (CNS) nuts will definitely stand me in good stead. IF I end up with CPS — I will rue the day.

I just cannot tell you how effective that ice therapy with the ‘ice pump’ is. I am convinced that it is what has helped me so much. I have it on about 16-hours a day. It is on now, set to 42°F, as I write.


All I have taken for medication so far is 325mg Tylenol and Aleve.

I have, so far, not needed any narcotics. I have two bottles, 60 pills, of opioids, one from ER and the other from the surgeon, unused. I hope this continues to be the case.

The nerve block was also amazing. It ran out Saturday night — right on schedule. They said 48-hours and it probably lasted about 54. Definitely felt some pain when it was gone. That is when I started taking Aleve.

Day 1 (Friday) — I took 7 Tylenols, much of it because I felt feverish.

Day 2 (Saturday) — 6 Tylenols during the day + 2 Aleves, late at night, after the nerve block was removed.

Day 3 (Sunday) — 6 Tylenols during the day + 2 Aleves at night.

Day 4 (Monday) — 1 Aleve so far and it is 5:30pm.

As far as I am concerned that is pretty amazing. Right now I feel no knee! It is pretty frozen — but don’t worry, I am not going to get frostbite.


Appears I am the lucky beneficiary of all of the concerted effort going into preventing the prescription of opioids.

Both the nerve block & ice machine blurbs tell doctors how they can be used instead of opioids. I am all in favor.

Seeing the surgeon tomorrow. Keeping fingers crossed.

So, just wanted to share with you in case, alas, knee surgery is to figure in your future. Based on my experience it might not be as painful as you might dread.

Well, I am still keeping fingers crossed. Pain is a funny ol’ thing. Don’t trust it — as far as I can throw it.


Related Posts:
Search ‘knee’ & ‘quadriceps‘.


by Anura Guruge

“Peripheral Neuropathy Due To Chemotherapy” — Patrice Bourgeois, My Former Workmate, Finds Out.

by Anura Guruge


Click to ENLARGE and read snippet here. Use link below to access the full post.


Link to full post at Patrice’s “Pat’s Cancer Journey” blog.


Peripheral neuropathy — and with that possibly Central Pain Syndrome (CPS) — can be a not-widely-disclosed side effect of chemotherapy.

Patrice, my former colleague at CASE Communications, is finding this out the hard way, to her cost and chagrin. This is not good. CPS, as you may know, is debilitating and has no cure.

Not sure what can be done about this. It is not like you can refuse chemotherapy if you have cancer. It appears that certain chemotherapy drugs affect the nervous system and once anything messes up the nervous system you run the risk of getting CPS. That is, alas, well known — at least of late.

Here is another post, this one by the ‘Canadian Cancer Society‘:


Related Posts:
Search ‘Patrice’.


by Anura Guruge

‘Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation’ (TMS) For Depression (& Chronic Pain): Brainsway vs. Neurostar.

by Anura Guruge



Into to TMS
from my ‘Central Pain Syndrome‘ (CPS) book.


In the U.S., from what I can determine, the two main (if not only) options for Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is based on Neurostar technology or Brainsway technology.

Though they are both classed as TMS they differ in terms of the magnetic stimulation techniques used.

The Brainsway supposedly represents the newer technology. It uses a bigger, more encapsulating H-coil that does cover a larger portion of the brain — and supposedly can go deeper. Neurostar, a pioneer in TMS, uses a 8-coil that does not envelop the brain as much as the H-coil. It is claimed that the H-coil can stimulate brain ’tissue’ 2.4 – 5.7 times deeper than the 8-coil. However, it should also be noted that it is easier to have Sham H-coils (i.e., placebo coils) than it is with 8-coils!

A Brainsway session is 15 minutes shorter per session than a Neurostar session; 22 minutes vs. 37 minutes.

Neurostar uses rTMS (as described in my book above).

Brainstar calls its process Deep TMS (dTMS). I cannot get anybody to tell me, as yet, whether dTMS uses a faster or slower ‘repetition’ rate (i.e., the rate of pulsing) than rTMS.

The Brainstar is still relatively new.

From what I can find there are two other companies that offer TMS products: Magstim and Magvita. I, however, have not found any ‘doctors’ offering TMS using these devices anywhere around New England. I will do more research.

Though only approved for treating Depression per se, TMS, whether rTMS or dTMS, is a viable treatment option for ‘Central Pain Syndrome‘ (CPS) and other instances of Chronic Pain, including Fibromyalgia, since any degree of depression exaggerates your perception of pain.

TMS was FDA approved for treating treatment-resistant depression as as of 2008.


Related Posts:
++++
Search on ‘pain’ for other related posts >>>>
++++
Check Category ‘books’ for other Anura Guruge book posts >>>>


by Anura Guruge


‘Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation’ (TMS) A Promising Cure For Chronic Pain as In ‘Central Pain Syndrome’.

by Anura Guruge


Click to ENLARGE and read here. Wikipedia entry: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transcranial_magnetic_stimulation


From my ‘Central Pain Syndrome‘ (CPS) book.


An interesting treatment option for ‘Central Pain Syndrome‘ (CPS).

It is said to be effective for treatment-resistant depression and is FDA approved as such (as of 2008).

At least some of the pain in chronic pain scenarios is due to depression. So it is possible that TMS works on pain by tackling the depression.

Just want to make sure that you are aware of this treatment option for chronic pain such as that of Central Pain Syndrome and Fibromyalgia.


Related Posts:
++++
Search on ‘pain’ for other related posts >>>>
++++
Check Category ‘books’ for other Anura Guruge book posts >>>>


by Anura Guruge