Tag Archives: engine

Cape Cod Central Railroad: The Good, The Bad & The UGLY.

by Anura Guruge


Click pictures to ENLARGE.

Attribution will be strictly enforced.

Cape Cod Central Railway Anura Guruge Sony a7II




On Thursday, August 10, 2017 Teischan & I took the ‘midday’, 2-hour Cape Cod Central Railroad excursion.


BOTTOM LINE: It is indeed a railway excursion, in historic carriages, pulled by a very well maintained and attractive EMD GP28 diesel engine (in our case, #2009). If you have never been on a train and are itching to do so, and this is your one big opportunity, by all means go ahead and do it — but unless you are ‘rich’ don’t bother paying the premium for the Dome. Yes, get the cheapest tickets. Notice that they never refer to this as a ‘Scenic’ ride — since the scenery is pick-a-boo. 70% of the time what you will see is this ⇓ (below) and they will tell you that that will be the case once you are on the train and it is moving. Yes, overgrown, dense foliage wreathed in thick vines (a feature of the Cape Cod landscape).


The station in Hyannis, the only one of the route, is NOT much of a station and as such there is NO railway station experience. Ditto when it comes to the engine. So, do not expect to see other engines, carriages etc. as you would do, say at the ‘Conway SCENIC Railway‘. This is NOT for the true railway enthusiast —  as in my case.

The onboard staff, especially an OLD (like in his late 70s), grossly obese conductor we had, are downright HOSTILE! That was something new. It was like being in a prison. No you can’t stand, no you can’t walk, no you can’t look out of the window. It was NO, NO, NO. I did not enjoy the experience. It reminded me of the joke about the Italian, on honeymoon with his new wife ‘Virginia‘, on a sleeper train out of New York heading down to Florida — when the conductor, early on in the evening shouts out, over the speakers ‘Norfolk, Virginia‘! (Say that out loud and try to imagine what an Italian married to a ‘Virginia’ might hear if he is in bed.)

So, this is my recommendation: only do it if you must and if so keep your costs down.



THE GOOD

1. Nice, well-maintained engine.

2. FREE (to $5) parking on the side of the station, which is great as parking in Hyannis is not easy and is expensive. You can see the parking, through the glass, to the side, behind Teischan.

3. Some decent scenery, including cranberry bogs (which I wanted to see) though interrupted views are not the norm:

4. Good view of the Bourne Bridge and the Cape Cod Canal:


THE BAD

1. Expensive! Overall, you have to question whether their prices are justifiable.

2. There is NO railway experience. I feel bad for the kids. A stark & bare station — badly maintained. It is like getting on a subway. The yard is 1/4-mile away and they don’t allow you to visit that! ‘Norfolk, Virginia‘!


THE UGLY

1. Very badly maintained rolling stock, with peeling paint, cracked window in the dome and totally glazed over windows:

2. Downright HOSTILE onboard staff. ‘Norfolk, Virginia‘! It was NOT a good experience and that is a shame!


P.S., The parked engine in the yard, at top, with a single BIG light, is an EMD F7, one of my favorite U.S. locomotives.


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by Anura Guruge

Amazon’s “Lumberyard” – A Free Cloud-Based 3D Game Developing Engine (That Will Boost AWS).

by Anura Guruge


amazonlumberyard

Click to ENLARGE and read this excerpt here. Use link below to access the original.

Click here to access “marketwatch.com” original.


This is clever and as a (newly suffering) Amazon shareholder I am impressed. This is a great way to get game developers to migrate to Amazon Web Services (AWS) is so called ‘Cloud’ play. and AWS is what helps Amazon generate decent profits. I don’t think many people have worked out the significance of this but this was strategic.


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by Anura Guruge

Red, 1989 Cadillac Allante For Sale In Alton, NH.

Dec2013x125

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 ..by Anura Guruge


Other car posts:
1. Restored 1974 Jensen-Healey in Alton — Aug. 28, 2012.
2. 1977 MGB in Pittsfield, NH — Oct. 8, 2012.


Click to ENLARGE.

Click to ENLARGE.


This beauty appeared by the Alton rotary earlier this week. I have always had a soft spot for the Allanté. The asking price was not outlandish given that I knew that that would never be the final price. I checked around. The price was middling. I don’t need a car and we hardly put any miles on the two we have. Plus I am known to go for 4 to 5 days without ever getting into a car. But, I miss not having a convertible especially when Summer beckons. For 30 years, since when I was 23, I have invariably owned a convertible or a T-Top. This is the longest I have gone in my adult life without a rag top. So, Devanee and I stopped by on Tuesday and had a look. Couple of small dings on the bodywork. Radio does not seem to work. The tires are new. It started without drama. But, I didn’t drive it. I spent 40 minutes ‘discussing’ price with the owner. We even reached a workable price. I even got an insurance quote. Then I started talking to mechanics. Maybe that was a mistake. One, who does all the work on our van, said categorically: “worst U.S. car ever built. Don’t get it at any price!”. That was bummer. There was a time many, many decades ago when I did use to change the oil and even brakes on cars. Not now, though recently I replaced the battery in the van. So if I had got this I would have to rely on others to maintain it for me. So this was not a good start. Went downhill from there. Was told that parts were expensive. Basically I was told to get anything else than this car. I wasn’t thrilled, but common sense prevailed.

Then later on in struck me. They talk about people who are fatally attracted to the wrong sort of partners. Well in my case this seems to be with cars. 30 years ago, I was totally, utterly infatuated (maybe even outright in love) with the Triumph Stag. I owned a Spitfire and was reaching a point when I could afford a Stag. I now remember, not that happily, that I had these exact same conversation with folks about the Stag, except then there was even family chipping in. Told that it was the worst car ever. And I really don’t deal well with unreliable cars, boats or computers. So, it is kind of important that I get cars that work 99.5% of the time. I still remember being told about the Stag: “If you really want to get one, get one but get somebody to put in a new 3L Ford engine into it”. That sounded way too much like hard work. So I never got a Stag. Instead went and bought a TR7. That TR7 served me well. So, I am in a bind. I have a feeling that I might just end up buying the next, reasonably price British convertible I see.

But, I want to pass the word out on this Allanté. It could be a good buy for somebody who can do some of the work on it. You shouldn’t have any problem finding it. It is on Rte 28 just before (or after) the rotary (depending where you are coming from (or going)). 


The captivatingly gorgeous Triumph Stag.


Found this picture of a silver Tr7 on the Web. This one must have been a twin. Mine was silver too, the 3rd but last TR7 built. This car and mine were probably the same year since my registration was MGM 327X — where the year ‘X’ happened to be the year. The reason I remember that registration, the only one I remember, because it just happened to be significant. 327X was an IBM terminal family and much of my life revolved around that terminal family one way or another.