Tag Archives: hiking

Somedays The Roadblocks In My Life Are Ethereal & Will Lift When There Is Light.

by Anura Guruge


roadblock Anura Guruge


I can deal with this. It just requires perseverance — a commodity that is not in short supply when it comes to I.

Funny thing. This ethereal roadblock kind of follows I. Always ahead of I today. But, it did not deter I. I knew there would be light.

Don’t you? SMILE.

There will always be light — in the end.


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by Anura Guruge

A New Roadblock Appears In My Life Just As Another Melts Away.

by Anura Guruge


The latest roadblock in my life.

roadblocks Anura Guruge


Just as this was melting away.

Click to ENLARGE and admire.


I am not complaining. Honest. So, the latest roadblock was yesterday. But, it wasn’t too major. Not enough to deter my progress. I, of course, prevailed.

The irony was that this was the day after I was rejoicing that my prior roadblock was melting away.

But, it is OK. I will manage. Thanks. SMILE.


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by Anura Guruge

The Roadblocks In My Life Are Literally Melting Away.

by Anura Guruge


This could NOT stop I.

Click to ENLARGE and admire.


5-weeks ago.

Click to ENLARGE.


I had not expected it to have melted that much — this soon. It was a pleasant surprise. I had expected that I would have to do some clamouring over packed snow/ice. No need. No roadblocks. Road clear and I went sailing by — quite merrily.


These were on my two local hiking trails. When not prevented by roadblocks this is what I get to enjoy.


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by Anura Guruge

The Latest Roadblock In My Life — And This One Is BIG.

by Anura Guruge


Today’s HUGE Roadblock.

From the other side, when I managed to get around.


This is the path leading to Alton town’s main park and for that to its much ballyhooed public trail. Appears that no one other than I wanted to venture out in the last 48-hours. I am kind of disappointed. This is New Hampshire and it hasn’t been that bad in terms of cold or snow.

So this was what I was trying to get to — and, of course, I did. Didn’t try to climb over the mound of snow. Wasn’t worth it. Instead, I walked around it.


This was last week’s roadblock.

And this was the week before.


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by Anura Guruge

The Roadblocks In My Life.

by Anura Guruge


Today’s Roadblock.

Click to ENLARGE.


Stopped me in my tracks. Yes, if I wanted I would NOT let it stand in my way. But, I had done enough mileage. So, I did NOT have to clamour over it and proceed.

If I did, it would have been an extension of this.

Click to ENLARGE.


This was last week’s roadblock. Was not as obstructive.


I did get around this one. I am careful around fallen trees. Had a friend who had one fall on him while he was hanging around trying to work out what to do. He was disabled for months. So, I am careful.


These were on my two local hiking trails. When not prevented by roadblocks this is what I get to enjoy.


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by Anura Guruge

Yet Another Walk In The Woods, ‘Chamberlain Road’, Alton, New Hampshire — July 16, 2019.

by Anura Guruge


Click pictures to ENLARGE.




Another rugged, secluded trail, through thick woods, v. close to home that I had never ventured on prior to this because as with ‘Africa Road‘, yesterday, I thought it was private — and I stay away from private property. Interesting and easy hike, though a tad rocky in spots and waterlogged at one end. It was fun though kind of monotonous. Nothing to see but woods and there is no reward at the end. Just turn around and walk back. But, great exercise and I got my 4-miles in. So, I am happy.


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by Anura Guruge


 

A Different Woods, ‘Africa Road’, Alton, New Hampshire — July 15, 2019.

by Anura Guruge


Click pictures to ENLARGE.




Though this road, duly marked by the town as ‘Africa Road’, is just over a mile from where I live, I have never ventured into it — over the last 12-years — because I was under the impression it was a private road, I try not to trespass (because I am not good at forgiving those that trespass on our property). Then, yesterday, I was told by a fellow, local runner (40-years my junior) that it was NOT a private road and that he uses it — BUT warned me that it was rocky. That was the understatement of the week.

Wow. What a road. There is a MAGNIFICENT property at the start of it. It is them that had put up various signs to discourage folks from coming down the road. I don’t blame them. They have quite the spread. You can see that on the GPS track, near the top with a HUGE cleared pasture. As soon as you pass their property it becomes rough. Real rough.

Now most of you know that I am no stranger to hiking. So, when I tell you that this was, indubitably, the most RUGGED trail I have ever hiked you will realize how rough it has to be. The elevation wasn’t bad. I have done hikes with much, much more elevation. It was the trail itself. Rocky and rutted. No scenery or views. Just a rather dark tunnel through the woods. Quite the adventure. The dogs loved it. Had to cross a small brook. I didn’t see it and only noticed it on the GPS. There is a small pond off the trail. The dogs did find it because they came out wet. I just assumed that they had gone in the brook again.

Yes, I plan to hike this many times. It was fun. Very secluded. Tranquil. Not a sound.


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by Anura Guruge


 

Garmin Does Us, The Temporarily Disabled, A Great Disservice.

by Anura Guruge


Click to ENLARGE. From my Garmin Connect.


Click to ENLARGE. From my Garmin Connect.


As some of you may know, from my prior posts, I tore my quadriceps tendon on February 28, 2018, and had knee surgery to repair it a week later, on March 7, 2019.

The week between the injury and the surgery, when I was wearing just a full-leg knee immobilizer I was quite mobile, didn’t use crutches — just a stick — and managed to even get in 5,000 steps — some of it in snow. Going up and down stairs was not an issue. Though I was not close to averaging my pre-injury 52-floors a day, I was still up and down the stairs a fair number of times. I live in a 4-story house with 3 staircases and I need to get around all 4 floors since our big TV is on the 1st floor and my work PC (for doing these posts and writing books) is on the 4th floor.

My Fenix 5 Plus was fine recording my steps and floors because I was still doing them the normal way — albeit using a walking stick.

Click to access post.


Things changed DRAMATICALLY post-surgery. No weight-bearing on the left-leg. Have to use crutches.

My Fenix 5 Plus does not measure my steps when using crutches! Why. Because I am not moving my arms about that much. Maybe there is a crutch-use setting but I am not aware of it. My first time being disabled — ever.

I have to go up and down the stairs on my BUM — using my arms. That is HARD. I had stopped doing pushups 12-years ago, and at 65 other than my running, climbing floors, shoveling snow and hiking I don’t do much. Upper body strength is not what it used to be. Climbing stairs using my arms is exhausting.

And now hear is the kicker. My Fenix 5 Plus is NOT counting the damn floors I climb — so laboriously. That is not fair. I climb, with help, 6 or 8 floors a day and go down as many, if not more. I climbed one floor to write this. Fenix 5 Plus says ‘0’. That is stupid. Expended more energy climbing that floor than I normally do bounding up 5.

The steps I understand.

The floors I don’t. I thought Garmin told us that floors climbed was calculated using the barometric altimeter. I think my altimeter isn’t busted. So, what gives.

Honestly, the least of my problems right now. Heart rate is working and thanks to my Fenix 5 Plus I know that I am still alive and that my heart rate, even with the surgery, is in the 60 range. So, that is good.

I will keep you posted. Hoped to be more active in about a month.


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by Anura Guruge

The Raw, Rugged Grandeur Of ‘Canyon de Chelly’ — Sun Set At The ‘White House’ Overlook.

by Anura Guruge


Click to ENLARGE.

Attribution WILL be enforced.


If you have been following all my posts about this amazing National Monument you would, by now, be very familiar with the ‘White House’ ruin and hiking the trail to it. This is at the overlook, after the hike, around 7:30pm, with a storm way out to the north.


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by Anura Guruge

Getting Lost On The Appalachian Trail For A Month & Then Dying Seems Incongruous.

by Anura Guruge


From Friday, May 25, 2016 U.K. “Daily Mail“.

Click images below to ENLARGE and read here.

mainehiker1atmainehiker2at


This is rather a disturbing story. I can relate to it on multiple fronts. I have managed to get myself lost (once quite recently) in the dense woods of New England. So I know what it is like. Everything looks the same. Lots and lots of trees. Given how dense the ‘brush’ can be the temptation is to try and take the path of least resistance. So it is easy to end up walking in circles. So there is definitely that. Though I do hike and have done day hikes on the Appalachian Trail (mainly in West Virginia and Virginia) I am not an avid-hiker neither am I an expert survivalist. But what happened to this poor lady just does not make sense.

She wondered around for 28 days plus she had a working phone for some of that time. You would have to think she must have had a GPS APP of some sort on the phone — assuming she didn’t have a proper GPS unit. You would think she carried a basic compass. Given that she was all kitted out for camping she must have had lighters or matches. Some people are saying that she should have carried a gun. But a compass, a GPS capability and the means to light a fire.

Why didn’t she light a fire — first day. If she was worried about setting the woods on fire she could have found a rock outcrop. Says she climbed at least one of these in search of a cell signal. The smoke, coming out of dense woods, would have attracted attention.

Plus, even given the vastness of Maine, it is hard to imagine that she would not have struck some form of ‘civilisation’ if she had walked in a straight line for 28 days. That is where a compass or GPS would come in. The time that I was most badly lost, with a 40 pound 3-year old in a backpack on my back, I walked looking for powerlines that I knew were in the area. Once I found them it was just a question of walking along them till I hit a road.

They say she had come close to a logging road. Just seems so incongruous — being lost in the woods of Maine for nearly a month.

This should serve as a lesson for all those that set out to walk through the woods of New England. You will be surprised how easy you can get lost. 


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by Anura Guruge