Tag Archives: light

NH’s “Old Man of the Mountain” Has Reappeared At ‘Thunder Hole’, Acadia National Park.

Anura Guruge December 2014 thumbnail.
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by Anura Guruge


Related Posts:
>> Isle au Haut
>> Bass Harbor Light
>> Acadia nude beaches
>> “Wonder View Inn”

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Refer to ‘Acadia’ master index page at TOP ↑ ↑


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What it looked like when it was in New Hampshire.
From Wikipedia. Click image to access Wikipedia entry.

oldmannh


I took the above three pictures on Sunday, September 6, 2015, at ‘Thunder Hole’, Acadia National Park. It is part of a rock formation to the right of ‘Thunder Hole’ (looking towards the Bay). No, you can’t see it, as such, from the steps or the walkway. Well, we don’t, when we are at Acadia, just stick to the well-trodden paths. We do like to clamor among the rocks and cliffs — and, in case you are wondering, you are permitted to do so, at will, albeit at your own risk. Teischan, of late, really has become addicted to rock clamoring and rock climbing. Most of the time I am trying to keep up with her. So it is she who finds these interesting places on the rocks.

You can’t deny that there is a definite resemblance. I recognized it at once. So I wanted to share it with you. Enjoy.



“Acadia National Park”, Maine — Bass Harbor Head Lighthouse.

Anura Guruge December 2014 thumbnail.
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by Anura Guruge


Related Posts:
>> Acadia nude beaches
>> “Wonder View Inn”
>> “Acadia View” bed & breakfast
>>  
Cromwell Harbor Motel

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This quintessential New England lighthouse, still operational, is in Acadia National Park — though at the extreme southernmost tip of ‘Mount Desert Island‘, about 45 minutes away (if you can force yourself to drive there without stopping to savor the views) from the Bar Harbor/’Park Loop‘ area which is what most people still think of as ‘the Park’. This ‘Light’ is definitely worth going to since it will also force you to drive through absolutely picture postcard picturesque ‘Somesville‘ and ‘this-is-Maine-at-its-best’ Southwest Harbor. This was (at least) our second trip to this ‘Light’. We typically spend at least 40 minutes there. So please add it to your list.



Yellow Tail Shiraz – Cabernet, U.S. $5.99 At Hannaford’s Right Now: A Quick Review


Anura Guruge, laughing, picture November 16, 2011.

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by Anura Guruge


Other wine reviews:
¤ Georges Duboeuf Beaujolais Nouveau 2012:
>>Fruity, Tangy, Fragrant & Light — Nov. 15, 2012.

¤ Beaujolais Nouveau 2012: Professional Review
>>Pretty Close To My Assessment — Nov. 16, 2012.


Click to ENLARGE.


I am sipping a glass of the Yellow Tail Shiraz – Cabernet as I pen this and I have to confess that it is indeed a richly satisfying tipple (as it invariably tends to be), made even more exquisite by the knowledge that it was a (on sale) $5.99 bottle.

Shiraz – Cabernet tends to be a tad sharp on the tongue on first sip; not in an unpleasant way but more in the spirit of awakening your senses that you are in the process of experiencing something subliminally pleasing. The sharpness methinks is the tannin from the Shiraz tempered by some of the sugar from the Cabernet. It is different. You get into the habit of anticipating it. Mint is not something one associates with red wine, but if you can’t appreciate what the heck I am talking about, think of it akin to a jolt of mint — though, of course, there is no mint involved. This agreeable sharpness at once morphs into a dull metallic undertone that I at least always associate with ‘Shiraz’, though I will be the first to admit that I am by no means an expert on ‘Shiraz’. That said I like ‘Shiraz’, but to be candid I really should add that what I like (and have familiarity with) is what connoisseurs will label as ‘cheap Shiraz’.

The Yellow Tail Shiraz – Cabernet because of the dull metallic taste that lingers, is what I would class as a ‘heavy’ red, whereas a Beaujolais Nouveau, in particular the 2012 from Georges Duboeuf, falls into the category of being a ‘light’ red. That it is ‘heavy’ is not a bad thing. It forces you to drink it slowly, contemplatively. It is not a wine that you would want to chug at, as if it was a a soda. It makes you appreciate that you have the fortune of being able to enjoy a wine. That is good.

The Yellow Tail Shiraz – Cabernet is a deep red wine, in the glass. The bouquet is minimal, but is tangy and sharp. Like an expensive, subtle cologne, for men.

I am partial to Yellow Tail wines, in particular their Shiraz or this Shiraz – Cabernet. The prices on Yellow Tail, whether at a store or a restaurant, tends to be good. I think that is true in general with most ‘Shiraz’, though again I do not go looking for ‘expensive’ wines since I find it hard to justify paying too much given that I know that my role is to convert wine-to-water.

If I see a Shiraz, by the glass, on a wine list I will invariably ask for it. Since Deanna rarely if ever drinks red wine and I tend rarely to drink more than one glass of wine a day, the days of me ordering wine by the flagon are long gone. Usually it is just one glass for me; with Deanna and the kids opting for water! So, my familiarity with Shiraz is (I think) limited to Yellow Tail and Woodbridge. I am sure I couldn’t tell them apart, and I have no desire to be able to. To me a Shiraz is a nice change from my customary Burgundy or Merlot. The Shiraz always tastes different. Us Brits have a saying that a ‘change is as good as a rest’. Thus, a Shiraz always imbues a much needed kick into my mainly staid, generally uneventful, what most would call ‘boring’ life. For that, I am grateful to Shiraz and to Yellow Tail.

At the current $5.99 (U.S.) per bottle the Yellow Tail Shiraz or Shiraz – Cabernet is hard to beat. The Shiraz – Cabernet is what I would class a ‘profound’ wine. It make you THINK — which in my book is always a wonderful thing given that my motto in life is ‘Think Free, Or Die‘. It is ideal for social discourse or for writing. It is like having a pipe. It gives you time to reflect; time to ponder.

Get yourself a bottle and enjoy.

Cheers. Happy Thanksgiving.


I happened to be shopping at Hannaford, Alton Beaujolais Nouveau Day 2012, November 15. I wondered into the wine aisle to see if they had any Nouveau. They didn’t.  But, they had Yellow Tail with a $2 off coupon. So, I bought a bottle of the Shiraz – Cabernet.

later that day I went to New Hampshire Liquor Store in Wolfeboro and bought a bottle of the Georges Duboeuf Beaujolais Nouveau 2012 for $9.99.

Very different wines; both great in their own right. I would hate to pick one over the other.

But, if I had to, I probably will pick the Yellow Tail Shiraz – Cabernet!

Sorry. I like the Georges Duboeuf Beaujolais Nouveau 2012. That is beyond doubt. But, it is a light, frivolous wine — as it is meant to be. You can chug it down like it was soda. nothing wrong with that. But, if you want an adult wine, that will force you to savor it, I will go with the Yellow Tail Shiraz – Cabernet.

Light Pollution In NH Lakes Region, Particularly On Rural Dirt Roads.


Anura Guruge, laughing, picture November 16, 2011.

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by Anura Guruge


The 3 places where I have spent most of my life. Click image for a Google maps based interactive display that you can enlarge.


Lakes Region, NH from the above map. Click to ENLARGE image.


The Milky Way when there is no light pollution — from ‘National Geographic’. Click to read thought provoking article.


Maybe it hits me the hardest because I only saw the Milky Way as an adult when I came to the U.S. (on my 2nd time around) in 1985 and lived way, way, way out in the sticks in rural Maryland, about 30 miles west of Baltimore. There is too much light pollution in Europe unless you can get way out (and then in the U.K. you have the clouds).

Yes, you can still see it, quite well, from the Lakes Region if you are lucky. But, totally unnecessary, totally uncalled for light pollution is becoming more and more of a problem.

We live on a dirt road. In the 27 years I have been in the U.S. (this time around), for 63% of that time. I have never had town water in any of the 6 homes I have owned in that time. 4 of them also had septic tanks. So I have always lived out in the sticks. Part of it, certainly, was the reaction of moving here from the U.K., which being a small country is considerably more congested.

What really confounds me is people who move to dirt roads, like the one we live in now, only to discover that they are afraid of the dark! So they have to have all these lights on to make them feel safe and secure. Cracks me up.

The guy next door is the worst. From what I can see he lived in parsonages, in the middle of town, for the last 25 years. He appears to be petrified of the dark. I went out last night at 10:45 pm to walk the dogs. His yard was lit up like Time’s Square. There is nobody around. It is 10:45. This is the country. But, he is not alone.

All of our neighbors seem to abhor the dark. They love those solar powered lights. I can even tolerate those since they are not bright. But, for some those are too tame. One of the neighbors, diagonally across, keeps his outside lights on all night, every night, year round. In winter he turns on a bright, outdoor spotlight that stays on 24/7 from October till April. They, who moved here from Nashua, don’t like the dark. That spotlight lights up our house and yard. More than once I had thought about sending him a check for about $30 to defray his electric bill because when that light is on I don’t have to use any of my outside lights. I just use his spare light.

I just wish people would give some thought to light pollution. It is a form of pollution. I am not the only one concerned. Even NASA is worried.