Tag Archives: Plaque

National Park Service Not Planning Anything For Acadia National Park July 8, 2016, Centennial (100 Years)!

by Anura Guruge


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They do have this nice banner (showing the ‘Precipice Trail’). Click to ENLARGE. You can find it here: nps.gov/acad/index.htm


What happens when you click the “Join Us“.

It takes you to the non-NPS Website which I have already shared with youtwice.

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And here is that Website:
Click here for the ‘official’ Acadia Centennial 2016 Webpage
— by the ‘Friends of Acadia’ as opposed to U.S. Park Service.


Related posts:
++++ Check ‘Acadia’ tab/page at top ↑ ↑ for lots of other posts & pictures. 


by Anura Guruge

Acadia National Park July 8, 2016, Centennial (100 Years) — BUT No Public Ceremony At The Park!

by Anura Guruge


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Click here for the ‘official’ Acadia Centennial 2016 Webpage
— by the ‘Friends of Acadia’ as opposed to U.S. Park Service.


Quite a few events listed BUT NOTHING
on Friday, July 8, 2016,
the actual centennial at the Park itself.

I thought there would be a public ceremony say
atop Cadillac Mountain by the
Stephen Tyng Mather plaque.

Seems a ‘poor show’.
Possible that the Rangers will still do something.
I guess I should check around.

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Picture taken by Deanna during our June 2014 visit (our 2nd visit).

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From above Website. Click to ENLARGE and read.


Related posts:
++++ Check ‘Acadia’ tab/page at top ↑ ↑ for lots of other posts & pictures. 


by Anura Guruge

Site Of ‘First Public School’ In The U.S.A. On Boston’s Freedom Trail.

Anura Guruge, June 8, 2013.P1040026

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by
Anura Guruge


Related Posts:
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Click to ENLARGE.



We went to Boston at the crack of dawn this morning to meet some Sri Lankan folks from Maryland, including a ‘cousin’ and his family, who wanted to tour Boston on their way back home from Acadia National Park in Maine.

One of the ladies, like so many female Sri Lankans in the U.S., was a Montessori teacher. She was anxious to see the ‘First Public School‘ site. I was not familiar with it. Like so many locals my familiarity with Boston’s famed Freedom Trail didn’t extend much beyond ‘Faneuil Hall‘ and the ‘Old State House‘. But, of course, it was easy enough to find on the Web.

After doing the obligatory State House, Faneuil, Quincy, Aquarium, Waterfront we wended to the location. Was easy enough to find. Just a few blocks over from the ‘Old State House’.

She was disappointed. She thought that the building would be still standing or that at least there would be a replica. Alas, no. Just an easy-to-miss plaque on the wall and the lovely mosaic inlaid into the sidewalk. But, it was worth it.

If you are by the State House walk the extra 400 yards to see the site. You can then tick it off the secondary bucket list.

King George V’s November 7, 1919, Proclamation Introducing The 2 Minute ‘Great Silence’.

Anura Guruge, June 8, 2013.

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by
Anura Guruge


Related posts:
1/ Origins Of “Armistice Day” (a.k.a “Poppy Day”) — June 11, 2013.
2/ ‘Blood Red Poppy Plaque’, Ontario, Canada … — July 3, 2013.
++++ Search for ‘Poppy’ using sidebar SEARCH >>>>


Part of My “Poppy Day” series on this Blog.

This post, as with other recent related posts, at the behest of  ‘Nancy’,
the lady from Ontario Canada who sent me the original, side on, picture of the ‘Poppy Plaque’ in Thunder Bay, Ontario.


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From http://www.salegion.co.za/two-minutes-silence.html. Click image to ENLARGE. Use link below to access original.

Click here to access original.


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From http://www.thetwominutesilence.co.uk/history. Click image to ENLARGE. Click link below to access the original.

Click here to access original.


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From http://www.bbc.co.uk/remembrance/how/silence.shtml. Click image to ENLARGE. Click link below to access original.

Click here to access original.


Nancy's transcript of the King's proclamation. Scanned image cope she sent to me. Click to ENLARGE.

Nancy’s transcript of the King’s proclamation. Scanned image cope she sent to me. Click to ENLARGE.


My continuing efforts, at the urging of ‘Nancy’, to accurately document as much of this history as possible.

The above BBC page has more of the Edward George Honey letter than I had in my earlier post. So that is good.

I would love to get my hands on the 7 November 1919 The Times of London with the actual proclamation.

Thank you, Nancy.

The Commemorative ‘Blood Red Poppy’ Plaque, Lobby Of The Prince Arthur Hotel, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada.

Anura Guruge, June 8, 2013.

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by
Anura Guruge


'Blood Red Poppy' Plaque, The Prince Arthur Hotel, Thunder bay, Ontario, Canada

Click to ENLARGE.


Related ‘Poppy’ posts:
>> “Poppy Day” Tradition In Canada & The Plaque That Hangs
>>  In The ‘Prince Arthur Hotel’ … — May 29, 2013.

++++ Search for ‘Poppy’ using sidebar SEARCH >>>>



Part of My “Poppy Day” series on this Blog.

This post, as with other recent related posts, at the behest of  ‘Nancy’,
the lady from Ontario Canada who sent me the original, side on, picture of the ‘Poppy Plaque in Thunder Bay, Ontario.


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Prince Arthur from days gone by.

So I contacted the hotel, viz. Prince Arthur Waterfront Hotel and Suites, 17 N. Cumberland St., Thunder Bay, ON P7A 4K8, Direct line: 807.346.5124

Tony Scarcello, the General Manager and Kory Morabito, the Sales Manager helped me out. This morning, Kory sent me the above picture. So now at last we have a good, clear image for posterity. With luck I might get more from Kory. Thank you Tony. Thank you Kory. Nancy will be delighted.

Kory also sent me this great aerial of the James Whalen marina taken by Robert Patterson, the Product Development Coordinator for Wilderness North. You can see The Hotel (as it looks now), in brick red, just to the right of center behind the covered, elevated walkway.

Prince Arthur Waterfront Hotel & Suites

Click to ENLARGE.

Origins Of “Armistice Day” (a.k.a “Poppy Day”).

Anura Guruge, June 8, 2013.

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by
Anura Guruge


Related ‘Poppy’ posts:
++++ Search for ‘Poppy’ using sidebar SEARCH >>>>


Plaque in memory of Australian Edward George Honey in “Kings Domain”, Birdwood Avenue, City of Melbourne, Down Under.


Part of My “Poppy Day” series on this Blog.

This post, as with other recent related posts, contributed by ‘Nancy’
the lady from Ontario Canada who sent me the picture of the ‘Poppy Plaque‘ in Thunder Bay, Ontario.


London Evening News in 1918.

On May 8, 1919, a letter to the editor signed ‘Warren Foster’ appears in London Evening News proposing the first anniversary of the armistice ending World War I 1918 November 11th, be commemorated by several moments of silence.

The author, actually an Australian journalist named George Edward Honey, living in London (U.K.), after being invalided out of the in the British army with a leg injury, was concerned about the huge celebrations on the streets on “Victory Day” 1918.

He suggested a silent commemoration of the sacrifices made and the lives lost during the war would be a far more appropriate way to mark the first anniversary of its end – the first “Armistice Day” in 1919.

Placement of the above plaque.

“Five little minutes only, silent minutes of national remembrance.  A very sacred intercession. Communion with the Glorious Dead who won us peace, and from the communion new strength, hope and faith in the morrow. Church services, too, if you will, but in the street, the home, the theatre, anywhere, indeed, where Englishmen and their women chance to be, surely in this five minutes of bitter-sweet silence there will be service enough.”

Honey’s letter did not immediately bring about a change but a similar suggestion was made to Sir Percy Fitzpatrick that October, reaching King George V, who on November 7, 1919, made an official proclamation, practicality setting it as a 2 minute period of silence (as opposed to ‘5’), beginning with the first stroke of the hour of 11 am November 11th across the Empire.

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We today are used to gatherings at local cenotaphs but most weren’t up yet in 1919. These monuments seem to have killed the brilliant idea of a stoppage in ordinary places to reflect individually, no dignitaries and school children and old guys having photo ops.

“Poppy Day” Tradition In Canada & The Plaque That Hangs In The ‘Prince Arthur Hotel’ In Thunder Bay, Ontario.

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by Anura Guruge


Prior posts:
>> Poppy Day, November 11, British Remembrance Day:
>> A Beautiful Tradition — Nov. 10, 2012.

>> Poppy Day, 2012: President Obama
>> In Arlington Without One — Nov. 11, 2012.
>> I ask President Obama to wear a poppyNov. 11, 2012.



To See a more detailed picture of this plaque
taken June 2013 — click.


From a contributor from Ontario, Canada.

This above plaque hangs in the lobby of the Prince Arthur Hotel in the city of Thunder Bay, Ontario, the amalgamation of twin cities Fort William and Port Arthur in 1970.

Mme. Anna Guerin, wife of a French jurist and founder of a Paris war orphanage reached out to North American for financial support. She was aware of Canadians’ strong association between the Flanders poppy and their heavy overseas losses, their “fallen” soldiers, since late December 1915 when an little poem “In Flanders Fields” appeared anonymously in England’s popular periodical ‘Punch‘.

This turned out to be authored by an Ontario physician army officer, composed that May while contemplating the fresh grave of friend, which later was sent to England by a fellow officer.

As she wrapped up her charitable fundraising, in 1921 Mme. Guerin brought out French-made cloth replicas of the wildflower and, with the encouragement of Canada’s first ‘returned soldiers’ association [see plaque] and public support asked government to recognize it and ask citizens everywhere to wear one on November 11 that year. Recently with our own Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Ottawa, the custom has arisen spontaneously of placing one’s poppy on the sculpture, a blanket of funeral-like flowers. A moving sight.

The first Armistice Day in the Empire, 1918, was an occasion of celebration and thanksgiving for victory. But in 1919 King George V asked his subjects everywhere to pause just where they were, to stop all traffic, and to observe two minute of silence at the stroke of 11 am in remembrance of those who did not come back. This tradition makes it a solemn day, remembering our many losses, the families they left behind, while former military “vets” join civilians recalling lost comrades.



Punch 1915


Prince Arthur Hotel a Thunder Bay landmark