Tag Archives: speed of light

What Has Happened Or What Will Happen To Betelgeuse (In Orion) — When It Is 700 Light-Years Away.

by Anura Guruge


Click to access U.K. “Daily Mail” article.


Click to ENLARGE if you are NOT familiar with ‘Betelgeuse’.


Click to ENLARGE and read here. Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Betelgeuse


As soon as I saw the headline in the U.K. ‘Daily Mail’ I knew it was going to be amusing. To be fair, and to their credit, they did make a decent enough fist of trying to explain the ‘dilemma’.

And what is that ‘dilemma’. When we are talking about stars, including our own Sun, we have to factor in the delay it takes for light from it to reach us. In the case of the Sun it takes 8 minutes and 20 seconds. Has to do with the enormous distances involved and the speed of light (which, though very fast, is only ‘that’ fast). So, if something was to happen to the Sun it would be 8 minutes and 20 seconds before we saw anything. Just the laws of physics.

Betelgeuse is ~640 light years away. That means it takes light from Betelgeuse ~640 years to arrive to us, on Earth.

So, we are seeing Betelgeuse as it was ~640 years ago!

Think about that.

When looking at stars we are always looking way back … into history.

We just have NO, NO, NO WAY of knowing what is happening at Betelgeuse right now.

All we see is what happened ~640 years ago.

So, it is difficult to write about ‘future’ events involving stars. The event might have already happened! We just don’t know.

That is the problem with this article. Betelgeuse could have already exploded — without us knowing.

Think about it. It is cool. SMILE.


P.S., All the stars that make up Orion are not the same distance away from us!

Betelgeuse is much closer than most of the others in that constellation! Something else to think about.

Click to ENLARGE.


Related posts:
Category ‘Astronomy’.


by Anura Guruge


 

Poignant Google Doodle For South African Anti-Apartheid Activist Steve Biko.

by Anura Guruge


Click image to ENLARGE.

Permanent access, independent of date,
provided via the Google Doodle Archive.


Click to ENLARGE and read here.
Use links above to access Google original.

‘They’ killed Steve Biko in 1977 (aged 30)!

bikkogd2 bikkogd3


Last Google Doodles:
>> South Pole.
>> Speed of light.

**** Check Category ‘Google Doodle’ (sidebar) for other Doodles >>>>


by Anura Guruge


Graphic Google Doodle For The 1st Expedition To Reach The South Pole — Not Shown In The U.S.!

by Anura Guruge


Click image to ENLARGE.

Permanent access, independent of date,
provided via the Google Doodle Archive.


Click to ENLARGE and read here.
Use links above to access Google original.

Why this was ALSO NOT shown
in the U.S. is a CRIME!

southpole1 southpole2

 


Last Google Doodles:
>> Speed of light.
>> Jagdish Chandra Bose.

**** Check Category ‘Google Doodle’ (sidebar) for other Doodles >>>>


by Anura Guruge


Very Educational Google Doodle For Measuring The Speed Of Light — Not Shown In The U.S.!

by Anura Guruge


lightgd111

Click image to ENLARGE.

Permanent access, independent of date,
provided via the Google Doodle Archive.


Click to ENLARGE and read here.
Use links above to access Google original.

Why this was NOT shown
in the U.S. is a CRIME!

lightgd111b


Last Google Doodles:
>> Jagdish Chandra Bose.
>> Louisa May Alcott.

**** Check Category ‘Google Doodle’ (sidebar) for other Doodles >>>>


by Anura Guruge


March 14, 3/14, Next Thursday Is World ‘PI Day’: A Celebration Of The Joys of Math. Happy Pi Day (Or For Some Of You, Happy Pie Day).

by Dec2013x125

..
.Anura Guruge


Related post:
>> The Math Museum In New York City
>>Mar. 4, 2013.


Click to access the OFFICIAL 'Pi Day' Website.

Click to ENLARGE … if you want a quick refresher on Pi. http://www.piday.org is the official Web site for ‘Pi Day’. Rejoice. Enjoy.


The 1st 1,000 digits of Pi. Click to ENLARGE.



Pi on my Faber Castell slide rule I have owned since 1968, when I was 15.

Pi on my Faber Castell slide rule I have owned since 1968, when I was 15. Click to ENLARGE.


Next Thursday, at least in the U.S. (and maybe in Canada, though I am not sure whether they actually have calendars up here), it is 3/14 or 3.14. In the rest of the world, in the U.K. and Sri Lanka, it is 14/3 or 14.3. But, since the U.S. rules the waves 3.14 is World Pie Day — and for those of you who are not into pi, just celebrate it as World Pie Day and have a pecan or meat pie and think of POOR me.

Pi.

I love Pi. Always have since I was introduced to it when I was about 8. I also love pie, both sweet and savory — but alas and alack I haven’t touched a pie, not even nibbled on the crust of one, in 6 weeks! Yes, I have managed to lose 11 pounds. I am down to 178 pounds. So, I am no longer as obese as I used to me, but that at the expense of apple, pecan, lemon and cherry pies, not to mention savory meat and French pies. Getting old sucks. Being pre-diabetic just makes it worse. But, I will celebrate Pi.

Pi is one of the two most important, pivotal, sacrosanct, physical constants in the Universe. The other ‘c’ – the speed of light (as in e = mc²). But, most people can’t remember c. c = 186,282 miles per second. I am not sure how many people even remember ‘G’ — the gravitational constant.

Pi is neat. Very neat.

When I want to have fun with my brain, I try to imagine early philosophers, who believed that all things in nature, divinely inspired, had perfect order. Just think of them, laying out little pieces of string trying to correlate the circumference of a circle to its radius. They must have thought that they were doing something wrong. How could it not be a exact number. Was God playing games?

I try to imagine whether in another world, another planet, in another galaxy, or even in the Milky Way, Pi might be different? I don’t think so.

Having been born a Buddhist, I was never expected to believe in an almighty, all seeing, all powerful God. Thank God. But, Pi to me, was yet another example that there is no all knowing, all seeing creator ‘up there’. Because, nobody with even a modicum of sense would have come up with Pi! Pi is chaotic. That is its abiding, never ending beauty. Infinite, mysterious, beguiling and beautiful. Pi.

Growing up, given my age, we didn’t have electronic calculators. I got my first electronic calculator, a bulky Casio, around 1972. I think it cost my father U.S. $200. I started with using 22/7 for Pi.

In 1971, in my first year at University, doing computer technology, one of the assignments we had was to calculate Pi to as many digits as we could in 3 seconds of compute time. No, we didn’t have dedicated computers. The PC was exactly a decade out. We used time-sharing systems. Computer usage was measured by the Milli-second and billed. 3 seconds compute time, which might equate to 5 minutes of elapsed time, was a lot. Oh! We also programmed using punched cards. They were batch jobs. You submitted a deck of cards and waited for that job to be run and the printout to be delivered to your pigeon hole. I can’t remember what algorithm we used. We programmed it in Fortran IV. I do remember spending 2 weeks refining and polishing my code, 3 to 4 times a day, to get more digits in the 3 seconds we got. Yes, I have to confess, I beat the rest of the class. I was a zealot. Total maniac. I worked on my programming like a man possessed. It was beyond an obsession. I had a very unusual 3 years at University for my 1st degree. To say it was WILD would not even capture 10% of it. There were those that claimed that I was horizontal for 75% of time at University — and it wasn’t inebriation because I didn’t take up alcohol until I got my 1st degree (though the drinking age was 16 or lower) and I never did drugs (though my inseparable best friend, 1968 to 1969, when living in Paris, was Charlie ‘Byrd’ Parker Jr., yes, THE Byrd’s son). [I think they exaggerate. It was probably only about 60%, though it might have looked longer to others.] Yes, I could program while horizontal and always had a notebook by my side to write down algorithms that would come to me in my sleep or in moments of inspiration. Yes, I was strange, even more or than now. Plus, I had a shaggy, uncut head of curly black hair, and an unwashed, smelly genuine, bona fide, from Afghan coat. No wonder IBM offered an ‘unconditional’ job when I was 19. With or without degree. Whenever. Just call this number. And I spent 10 months trying to avoid that … writing letters to all the African game reserves asking for a job as a game warden! Just think. If I had got ONE offer, I would have been gone. None of this. All their fault.

Anyway, next Thursday. MATH DAY. Pi day. Alas I will still not indulge with a pie. But, lets celebrate.