Tag Archives: Wang

Selfies My Way — The New Bowtie Look New Year’s Eve & New Year’s Day, 2020.

by Anura Guruge


Click picture to ENLARGE.

Yes, you are free to steal these pictures.


I, as you may have noticed from some of the prior selfies, wear a tie quite often. My 13-year old daughter is used to that. But, she had never seen me in a bowtie. I did use to wear bowties c. 1987 when I worked for Wang — given that this was a trademark of the founder and then CEO, Dr. An Wang. Quite a few of us, at Wang, wore bowties. Well around Christmas she made me get a bowtie so that I could wear it around New Year’s. So, I had to take some selfies. That is the story. SMILE.


60 posts in the “Taking Selfies My Way” series.

Search ‘Selfies‘ using blog’s search function.


Related posts:
Search ‘Selfies’.


by Anura Guruge

More Bad News From Nikon Might Signal A Much-Needed Re-Trenching/Consolidation Of The Digital Camera Market.

by Anura Guruge


Another BAD NEWS Press Release
from Nikon on February 13, 2017.

nikonbad

Click to ENLARGE. You can find original Press Release at Nikon.com.


This Press Release right on the heels of the one that
the much anticipated 1″ DL compacts have been cancelled.


Mobile phones with high-quality camera capability have been steadily eating into digital camera sales for the last few years.

It is finally beginning to take a heavy toll. Nikon could be the first to stumble.

Nikon currently, per DPReview, has 250 cameras on its books. That is crazy.

Canon has 278, Sony 277, Olympus 243, Fujifilm 239, Panasonic 193 and Pentax 135.

That is a total of 1,615 digital cameras from 7 camera manufacturers — at an average of 230 per vendor.

I have consistently maintained that this is too many. Each camera that you keep on your books costs money.

Nikon announced 14 new cameras in 2016 — 3 of them being the 1″ DL compacts that were cancelled yesterday.

Nikon and the others MUST cut back on new releases. We do NOT need so many variants at so many different price points.

Just a couple of good ones, at the low, medium and high bands.

The camera industry has ALREADY seen a sea change in vendors. Kodak, Polaroid and Agfa are no longer the market leaders they one were.

We have seen such dramatic shifts in leadership in the computer industry. Once famous names, now no more; e.g., NCR, Burroughs, CDC, Univac, DEC, DG, Wang, Stratus, Sun etc. etc.

The same WILL happen to these digital camera vendors. Mark my word.


nikondl2Related Posts:
++++ Check Categories ‘Sony’ & ‘Six Images’ for other related posts >>>>


by Anura Guruge

Now That It Is Twice The ‘Size’ Amazon Should Buy IBM, For ‘Watson’, And Sell Sever-Side To Google.

.Anura Guruge December 2014 thumbnail
.
.
.
.

.
by Anura Guruge


Related Posts:
>> Irony of IBM revenue decline.
>> Resurrect Grid Computing.
>> IBM, Bob Dylan & Watson.

>> Donate Hursley House …
>> Get rid of unproductive R&D.
>> IBM’s 26% layoff is NOT enough.

>>
Punch-drunk IBM, 40% layoff.

>> “Think” sign — Aug. 28, 2014.

>> Hursley’s John Fairclough …
>> Mainframe 50th.
>> Gene Amdahl & I.

++++
Search on “Hursley”, “IBM” & “mainframes” for other IBM (Hursley) related posts … and also ‘Dylan’ >>>>


While IBM’s results continue to confound and contract, Amazon and Google are riding high.

To hear Amazon described as a TECH GIANT cracks me up (and partly because I am an Amazon shareholder and as such have not been able to stop smiling all day).

Amazon’s market cap is now more than TWICE that of poor IBM.

Amazon is better positioned to truly exploit the AI magic of ‘Watson‘ than IBM.

Think about it. Amazon already uses some sophisticated AI to tell us, daily, as to what we should be buying next. Amazon with Watson will rule the World.

Amazon probably does NOT need IBM’s much vaunted, by increasingly long in the tooth, server technology. But it and Google should divi it up.

Don’t for a SECOND think that this is a strange suggestion and that pigs will fly before this will happen.

Remember, remember Wang and DEC from the 1980s. In 1984, Wang was 2nd to IBM in computer revenues. Today it is GONE. GONE. GONE.

DEC for so long was a GIANT, slightly dwarfed by IBM. Today is a buried, forgotten, somewhere inside HP!

So this is not off the charts.

Just remember who told you about this first — on Friday, October 23, 2015, a day when AMZN shares were up 6% on the DAY. SMILE.


‘Old Spice’, ‘Brut’ Or ‘Bay Rum’ As Aftershave Astringents & Aroma.

Anura Guruge, June 8, 2013.

..
.
by
Anura Guruge


This morning watching MSNBC we discovered that ‘Old Spice‘ was back in circulation due to a very cute and clever viral video on YouTube. Deanna just loved it — though nearly all of her experiences is mainly with daughters. 

Click to access IF you haven't seen it. It is quite funny and cute.

Click to access IF you haven’t seen it. It is quite funny and cute.


oldspicebottle112What amused me about this new interest in ‘Old Spice‘ was that of late, and by that I mean the last 3 months (or so), I have been occasionally using ‘Old Spice’ as an aftershave. A few months ago I, with a penchant for collecting old bottles, saw an old, classic ‘Old Spice’ bottle, more than likely at the (ever delightful) Alton dump swap shop, and picked it up. It was not empty. It was nearly full and it smelt authentic and ‘good’. Well aftershave doesn’t spoil plus I have very thick skin. So I put the bottle on my bathroom sink and use it — not every day, but maybe a few times a week. I have used ‘Old Spice’ in the past but I was never into it — much. I wasn’t that enamoured with its smell.

brutFor as long as I can remember ‘Faberge Brut‘ was my goto aftershave, definitely in my 20s, 30s and 40s. The green bottle, with the suspended badge, was very much a part of my life. I, of course, remember the ‘tall’ brown box, just like in this image. I think the Brut had to do with me having been a ‘Diplomatic Brat‘ in the 1970s. There are certain things whose prices are kind of upside down if you can get them ‘duty-free’ at true, diplomats-only prices — ideally from a specialized store (such as in the UNESCO building in Paris) or from a specialized catalog. Brut must have been ‘cheap’ duty-free, as was good caviar. When I was attending University in Swansea in the early 1970s I could get caviar for cheaper than I could buy cans of sardines. So I would have bottles and bottles of caviar sent to me. I think ditto for Brut.

I had really not given much thought at all to my affectation for Brut until I got an e-mail, in 2001, from a lady who wanted to determine whether I, like her, had worked for Wang, at the iconic Wang Towers in Lowell, MA. She had seen me on the Internet and was trying to place me. Her description of me was: ‘were you the guys who always wore a three-piece suit and smelled of Brut. Us secretaries always knew you were around from the Brut …’. To begin with I was mortified. I had not realized that Brut had become a trademark. Then I started laughing. Well, that had to have been me. The three-piece suit reference alone was a dead giveaway. At that time I lived in three-piece or double-breasted suits from London. So, after I got that e-mail I went and checked. I didn’t have any Brut! Next time I was in Manchester I stopped and got a bottle.

I don’t have any Brut right now either — and that is OK. Deanna used to get me men’s fragrance, usually ‘Perry Ellis’. I think I still have three bottles, of light blue stuff, in various stages of use, in the bathroom. Yes, women have told Deanna that her husband smells good. I am glad — though I am also known to take the occasional shower, whether I need it or not.

BayRumDuring the last 5 years or so, old age having crept in, nostalgia played a major role in my life. I used to remember the Bay Rum they used to put on my head, in Ceylon, after a hair cut. I always liked the smell of Bay Rum. Very robust and masculine. I went looking for Bay Rum. Of course, thanks to the magic of the Internet, you can find anything. I have been using this ‘Ogallala‘ (and what a name) ‘Bay Rum‘, from this blue bottle, for the last few years. I can use it on my hair and on my face. Twofer. I really do like the smell. Yes, I also have a bottle of ‘Brylcreem‘! Yep, this nostalgia thing has bit deep. I am the retro man, 1950s all over again.

I have NEVER relied on aftershave as an astringent. As I once heard, famously, slapping your face alone does as well. I am sucker for LOTION. For 40 years, without fail, day-in, day-out, I used ‘Oil of Olay‘ original on my face. I still use some form of lotion on my face everyday, without fail. I can’t face the day without it. So, the lotion takes care of the skin conditioning. So, for me, the aftershave is just for the smell. For now, I am cool with the Ogallala Bay Rum. But, now that I am thinking of it, I will have to get some Brut and start buying some old, iconic Brut bottles on eBay.

From a 1988 Wang marketing brochure ‘Wang on Networking’. Guess which one I am. And PLEASE don’t ask me about my other hand. It is but a bad optical illusion. I got so much ‘shtick’ for that when the brochure came out. None of us saw the proofs. I now dread that I probably intoxicated that poor lady with my Brut!

More Tips On MASTERING E-Mails: The 3rd MOST Valuable Piece Of Professional Advice I Received.

Anura Guruge, June 8, 2013.

..
.
by
Anura Guruge


Related posts:
>> Getting your FACTS RIGHT re. e-mails — Nov. 2, 2013.
++++ Do a SEARCH on ‘Alton Central’ from Sidebar search trench for other related posts >>>>>


Click to ENLARGE.

Click to ENLARGE.

I was told this, one morning in 1981, in Cockfosters (I kid you not), N. London, by Chris James, my 2nd-line manager (actually a Director) at ITT Data Systems (U.K.) [by FAR the BEST and FUN company I have ever worked for and I worked for quite a few including IBM, Wang, Northern Telecom & BBN.]

telex-largeChris, who went onto become a mega success in networking was a remarkable man; beyond clever, very funny and extremely kind. He taught me a lot about a bunch of things — plus some very valuable pointers I never forgot about how to fill in expense reports, ‘correctly’, so that they would never be denied! In my youth, I really was blessed. I had some AMAZING bosses who went out of their way to help me — given that I needed as much help as I could get.

In 1981 there was no widespread e-mail per se (though I had started using a very primitive messaging scheme at IBM in 1976 to communicate with R&D peers at a sister IBM Lab. in Japan about the new 3270 system we were working on). Instead what we had was TELEXES — ITT a leading provider of Telex solutions. Telexes were a grandiose form of telegrams. It was all paper and paper tape. I still get very nostalgic when I think of Telexes — since, as you might have guessed, I was a huge user of telexes. At ITT we had a Telex room with a bunch of very nice young ladies. We also had Telex forms. You wrote out your Telex on a form, with the ‘To:s’ and the ‘CC:s’ AND their Telex phone numbers, and then took it down to be typed; BCC was a bit difficult with Telex. In my case, given that I would have a long distribution list and my propensity for resending stuff etc. etc., the girls wouldn’t bang it out and transmit it (there being a small amount of memory to retain a copy). They would first transcribe it onto paper tape. Then they could reuse it! It was very clever.

So on that day I was sitting in Chris’ office and he got a long Telex delivered. He started reading it … That is when he looked up, with his habitual grin on his face, and told me the above … The next few days I put it to the test. Chris, as ever, WAS RIGHT.

Even today, 30 years later, as soon as I get an e-mail the FIRST thing I read is the DISTRIBUTION LIST.

Ditto when I send an e-mail. I check the distribution list carefully BEFORE I hit send. I might forget an attachment BUT rarely, if ever, do I screw up when it comes to who I send e-mails.



The 2nd most valuable piece of professional I got was also at ITT, Cockfosters. This time it was by my 1st line manager, Steve Kane. Steve was amazing. He had a degree in philosophy and was incredibly astute. He really understood who people thought and as such knew exactly who to deal with them. Steve was VERY GOOD TO ME. He made me the U.K. Customer Support Manager for ITT Data Systems (U.K.) the night before my 27th birthday — so that I would be able to boast that I became an ITT Manager at 26! That is Steve. Always thinking of how to motivate and reward people.

As Customer Support Manager, with about 6 top-notch software engineers working for me, and a client base that included Xerox, Exxon, Ford, British Leyland, British Petroleum etc. etc., I used to have to deal with a whole bunch of ‘problems’ on a daily basis. One day I was getting beaten up, badly, by Ford. We were having a problem and we just didn’t have a quick fix. So as the Support Manager they were unloading on me. I was 27 and was getting ‘upset’. Steve calls me in. He then basically told me, his training in philosophy again at the forefront:

“Anu, there is really NO POINT worrying about work-related problems. If you want to worry about things worry about stuff that is not work-related. Work-related problems come and go. A year from today I can call you in and ask you what you were worrying about ON THIS DAY — and you will NOT REMEMBER. In the same way IF I asked you what you were working on a year ago today you won’t remember unless you go look it up. So, REMEMBER THE ONE YEAR RULE. You will not remeber work-related problems a year from now. So don’t let them bother you.”

Yes, of course, I know that there can be exceptions. But, this made sense — like nearly all things Steve Kane would tell me. I paid heed. I even, given my then very good, semi-photographic memory, tried to keep track of work-related ‘problems’ on a year basis. In those days I never maintained a paper appointments book or diary BUT would remember 3 weeks of travel, appointments and meetings in my HEAD (to the annoyance of all, especially my dear Secretary). My memory was that good. I or my secretary wrote all my commitments on a huge, purple, wall chart in my room. I would look at it when I was in my office and I could then SEE IT in my minds eye just like a photograph! But, even with that memory Steve Kane’s 1-year rule was good.

In the ensuing 3 decades I have conveyed Steve’s words of wisdom to hundreds of others.

Many have agreed that it made sense — and that it helped them.

Thank YOU, Steve. So that was #2.



The very, very BEST professional advice I ever had, and I would NOT BE HERE if not for it, was from my 1st ever boss, the inimitable Les B. of IBM Hursely.

I have told this story in print a number of times, so I am going to keep it short.

I joined IBM on August 27, 1974 — exactly a week ahead of my 21st birthday. It was my very 1st job of any sort.

A couple of months into the job a uniformed security guard came to see me and handed me a REGISTERED CONFIDENTIAL document — one of the highest levels of secure documents at IBM, hence the personal hand-delivery by a uniformed guard. WHY I got that Registered Confidential document that day is still a mystery! I think it was a mistake. IF I believed in spiritual stuff I would call it providential.

The document was about something called ‘SNA‘ — and that henceforth it would stand for ‘Systems Network Architecture‘ as opposed to ‘SINGLE Network Architecture‘. This had to do with the anti-trust law suit that plagued IBM in those days and influenced each and every decision.

I was NOT working on SNA. I had never heard of SNA. I was still brand new.

I went to see Les. Les was the epitome of an ‘open door’, very relaxed, VERY SOCIAL manager. I walk in with the document in my hand … and start: “Hey, Les, I just got this about S.N. …”

I never got to get out the “A”. Les, waving his hand dismissively, cut me off.

He said:

“Ahh! Forget about it.
It will NEVER CATCH ON”.

I was 21. I had been a rebel for the last 5 years. I might have got my hair cut (after 2 years) and was wearing a tie — but the rebellious instincts were still there.

Something told me that this was my destiny.

I walked straight out of Les’ office to the Hursley Library — which happened to be nearby. In those days before the Internet, I used to spend a lot of time in libraries. So already the Head Librarian knew me well. I went up to her and asked her to order me (as all of us IBM employees were allowed to do) any INTRODUCTORY manuals that IBM had on SNA.

Two weeks later I got, in an envelope, a thin 32 page, RED covered “SNA: An Introduction”. I read it in one go. Made sense though I wasn’t sure what it was all about!

Over the next 30 years SNA made me what I am.

SNA from the early 1980s to 2000 was HUGE.

It was THE networking scheme prior to the Internet.

Thanks to Les’ advice I was, the uncontested, ‘Mr. SNA’, during that time.

Google it.



New Hampshire’s Famous ‘Live Free Or Die’ Motto Only Came To Be In 1945.

Anura Guruge, laughing, picture November 16, 2011.

….
……
by Anura Guruge




I moved to New Hampshire in the Fall of 1986 BECAUSE of the motto!

I was living in Maryland (having come over from Britain in February 1985 (for what was my second stint in the U.S.)) and had been offered a job with Wang in Lowell. On one of the trips up to Lowell I saw a NH license plate and knew that I had no choice. I had to live in NH because that motto struck a chord. I was hooked. I could relate to it.

I still love it. I even adopted it to be mine: ‘Think Free Or Die‘, as you can see on my Web site.



I will, however, readily confess that despite my obvious fondness and affinity I had never bothered to check up on its origins or history. I am also sure that it wasn’t a topic covered in depth in my 2-day ‘Granite State Ambassador‘ (GSA) training class in 2001.

So, I was taken aback, when reading in my AARP Monthly Supplement for September (and getting even more convinced that I am ready to shortly keel over) an article about the battle ground states for the November election I saw a claim that the ‘Live Free Or Die‘ had only come to be in 1945. Wow. I had assumed that it went back to the 1860s, post U.S. Civil War. Since I do not take everything I read as Gospel I Googled it. Wow. They were right.

1945 — during the midst of WW II. The State Emblem came to be at the same time. I learned a lot in a very short time.

It comes from the American Revolutionary War, as opposed to the Civil War. It was coined by General John Stark, supposedly NH’s most famous soldier in that war. He wrote it, in July 31, 1809, as a toast to be given at a Battle of Bennington anniversary reunion dinner that he could not attend due to poor health. His toast was: Live free or die: Death is not the worst of evils.

I kind of remember seeing that there had been protests against the motto — especially its appearance on ALL NH non-commercial license plates. I now found details. As you could guess there are those that find this battle cry too incendiary, especially the part about the dying. Per the U.S. Supreme Court, as of 1977, you can cover up part of the motto on license plates … possibly even the whole motto, though in 27-years of living in NH I don’t recall ever seeing a covered up motto.